Round and Round We Go

Round and Round We Go

A person observes something, has a question about it, makes a hypothesis, and then does a study. The conclusion from the study is shared with others. Others try to reproduce the same results from the study and are successful. The original hypothesis is still scrutinized, but with the increased reproducibility it comes to be accepted, unless someone proves it incorrect. This is the scientific method, a tale as old as time.

But things that are observable? That is no longer a hypothesis, it’s a fact. You wouldn’t win any scientific awards for seeing that the sun is shining, cucumbers are green, or noting that Goldfish are better than Cheez-Its. Those are facts apparent to everyone. One such detectable fact? The Earth is round. People have known the Earth was round since the 3rd century BC. And while most of you agree the earth is round, there are some who don’t. It’s sort of understandable. You can’t see the whole Earth at once. You’ve never been to space. But you don’t need to go to space to see the Earth is round. Either for your own edification or the sweet “booyah” of proving someone wrong, here are some ways to observe your not flat Earth. 

Doing anything August 7th? Go outside and see the partial lunar eclipse. Lunar eclipses happen when the Earth posts up between the sun and the moon and its shadow is visible on the moon. What shape is that shadow in? That’s right, it’s a curve.

Not free August 7th? Walk/drive/fly to your nearest coast and watch ships sail in from the horizon. What part of the ship do you see first? The top, correct? That’s the same principle that applies if you see a city from far far away. You don’t see the whole city, but just the tops of the skyscrapers from a distance because the curvature of the Earth blocks the bottom out of sight.

Speaking of looking far away, standing on the ground you can’t really see far away objects really well. So you think, “better get to higher ground.” Why can you see far away things better from higher up? Because the Earth is round and the curvature of the Earth obscures your sight.

What about stargazing? If the Earth is flat you should be able to see the same constellations from everywhere on the planet, but you can’t. Aristotle noticed this way back before there were pictures of the Earth from satellites. The constellations you are used to seeing are at different places in the sky when you go nearer or further away from the equator. 

Speaking of night and day — timezones. If the Earth was flat and the Sun was more of a spotlight on a particular area, you would be able to see the sun as a spotlight not shining on your part of the Earth. 

So for now, you can prove to yourself and others that the Earth is in fact round. But even if you can’t, there are many more tests to prove that the Earth isn’t flat. Don’t buy into pseudo-science.

Sunkissed

Sunkissed

Where did you come from? Where did you go?

Where did you come from? Where did you go?