(Please Don't) Eat My Dust

(Please Don't) Eat My Dust

March 20th marked the beginning of the Vernal Equinox. (Note: not a gym) The Vernal Equinox means the beginning of the spring season for those of us in the Northern Hemisphere. Those of you in the Southern Hemisphere –  have fun falling back to cooler weather #naht! For some, the commencement of spring also means the commencement of runny noses, sneezing, and itchy eyes. But for the unlucky few of us with dust allergies, there is no seasonal reprieve from hay fever. No matter the season, dust is always around. After wiping down all of the surfaces of your house, 3 days later, dust is still like

So after windex-ing that mess for the millionth time you sigh and you think to yourself, “Why the heck does this even happen?”

Someone probably told you that dust is 75 percent dead skin cells, but that isn’t true. There are only two fairly obvious sources of dust, indoor and outdoor. Dust analysts from the University of Arizona found that two-thirds of dust comes from outdoor sources. That means that despite your best efforts, every time you walk in from the outdoors, open a window, or traipse about with your shoes on, outdoor dust is all

Outdoor dust can be anything from bits of cars, roads, soil, construction, leaves, to even sand traveling from other places.

 Source: Telegraph

Source: Telegraph

The indoor contribution to DustTown can come from bedding, mattresses, food particles, and, yes, even skin dander from people or pets. But when they enter your home, the dust particles often mingle together forming fluffy or solid indoor/outdoor mixtures that accumulate below your sofa or in that corner that is just too hard to reach. (You know exactly which corner that is.) 

What about the terrifying dust mites? Dust mites are typically less than 0.008 inches (or 0.2 millimeters) in length and feed on human skin, but, thankfully, don’t live on humans. On average, people shed about 1.3 grams of skin a day, making us the perfect match for a dust mite colony. #relationshipgoals #swiperight

Because they are relatively small, when you disturb them by moving about, it can take over an hour for them to settle out of the air.

But, in general, these little dudes are gross, but pretty harmless. The true dangers are the flame retardants, pesticides, and other chemicals that can enter into your dust pile and body. These can be inhaled, but also ingested. Children are especially at risk because they often put toys in their mouths while playing on the floor. Adults who strongly believe in the 5 second rule are also at risk, as well. Using air filters, cleaning your vacuum filter, and reading up about the chemicals in your soft surfaces can help reduce these dangers. Moral of the story? A clean home is a non-deathtrappy one. DEATH TO DUST BUNNIES!

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