Shop 'til You Drop

Shop 'til You Drop

This has been a tough November, friends. The world seems to be spiraling into a deep dark back hole, and it is likely that a lot of us look like

So when turning to uplifting memes of President Obama and Joe Biden doesn’t soothe those woes, we can always turn to what we all do best. Not apple picking and no it is definitely not watching Love Actually for the umpteenth time.

It is,    

If you are trying to predict how light your wallet will get this holiday shopping season, according to a survey conducted by the National Retail Federation, American consumers are predicted to spend an average of $935.58 on holiday gifts this year, while 6 in 10 individuals are projected to spend $139.91 on personal shopping, marking a 4 percent increase since last year and the 2nd highest personal spending levels since 1993. Basically, according to predictions, this is the shopping season to trump (*weeps*) all seasons.

Nevertheless, keep in mind that this survey was done before the results of the U.S. Presidential elections.  With all that has happened during this election season, many of us who are not happy with the results might opt to sit back in our houses and decide to cut down on our spending due to post-election trauma or we could go the other way. 
For the latter, let the shopping games begin! 

While you are watching people fight over a slightly discounted television, it probably won’t surprise you that more than 6 percent of the U.S. population are compulsive buyers (aka oniomania). According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, oniomania is an impulse-control disorder, characterized by an obsession with shopping and inability to resist purchasing unneeded items. Consequences can include increased distress, anxiety, along with social and work impairment and financial problems. People with oniomania also frequently meet the criteria for mood, anxiety, substance abuse and eating disorders. Proposed neurological theories for this compulsion include dopamine, serotonin, and opioid system disruption.

Although very little is known about the mechanism of this disorder, oniomania seems to exist mainly in developed countries. Recommendations for people with compulsive buying behaviors include

  • Hide wallet
  • Shop with friends and relatives (They might just stop you from buying the fiftieth pair of shoes.)
  • Actively seek other modes of entertainment. (Roll around in the snow, hide in the pantry, eat a cookie, call a friend.)

Also, as we say a much-awaited goodbye to 2016, if you are feeling the blues, consider some alternate shopping and gift-giving options:

Check if you might have a shopping addiction here.    

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Science Made Simple

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